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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
into this further because i i think this is on c-span and i am still friends with bob. but i was paid an average i think my take-home pay for two weeks was $350 for two weeks. i live with two elderly ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. i had nothing. whenever anybody complains when they're young and they complain about trying to find a job, i go, try living with two old ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. try it. then they invited their older sister to live with them. so there were three. anyway, apparently ronald reagan twice a year goes to people's houses to have dinner. chose to go to my boss' house. so i ago, what do you need quick so of course i'm mowing the lawn and washing the windows. i'm hoping that over time undoing all of this stuff sooner or later he was a greg, you can stick around and meet the president. and sooner or later like days and days of preparation, that's what happened and he asked me. the high point, a couple of high point to meeting ronald reagan. one of them was when the dog sniffing bob's came in and urinated on my boss' briefcase. [lau
for the american spectator which was run by bob gerald. an interesting guy. for i went to the drugstore lot picking up mysterious things. i won't get into this further. 5 with paid, my take-home pay was $360 for two weeks. i lived with two elderly ladies on george mason drive in arlington, va.. i had nothing. when somebody complains about tried to find a job by 65 living with two old ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia and they invited their older sister to live with them. their work three. anyway. ronald reagan a year ago to -- go to my boss's house, what do you need? i am mulling the lawn and washing the windows and hoping over time i am doing all of this stuff that sooner or later he will say stick around and meet the president and sooner or later after days and days of preparation that is what happened. the high point, there are a couple high points. one of them was when the bomb sniffer dogs urinated on my boss's briefcase. to this day he thinks it was me. it might have been. the great thing about dogs, they don't live long enough to tell stories. the unicorn 03 year. the dinne
that joke about bob is that he is a lovable guy. [laughter] are we going to make a speech about bob? because i will. i've got nothing to do. bob is a great guy. this is on c-span and he will say why are you defending me? bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. [laughter] i should shut up. i should just quit. another thing i have in common with ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. on june 12, 19 and seven he told soviet premier gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured serving and wearing a fur costume. all she does is go around central park and take pictures of this poor sweaty men man all over central park. it's disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influence millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world
the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does it to win votes. bob jones had just moved, just moved his university and thurmond needed votes in south carolina. had lost in 1950 race for the senate to johnson, larger on the strength of votes he didn't win in the up country. that began a long process, a long relationship of thurmond with conservatives fundamentalists and evangelicals who are looking to get involved in the political process. so we need to understand thurmond's racial politics in the mix of these other conservative causes, these conservative issues that he was very involved in. and to see how they intersect with one another. and i think doing so gives us the history of what strom thurmond's america looks like, and else is rethink not only was going on in the south but was going on in the national conservative political realm as well. rethink and strom thurmond helps us think modern conservatism to a history i think that is too often thurmond is left out of because we only remember him as this kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. let me read you, an excerpt
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
that we need a dialogue and much of the time whether it is bob costas getting in trouble or the doctors in florida told they can't talk about it or the military saying they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical we need to deal with this issue because it's important. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: i've always felt the gun control side that we want to talk and maybe the other side doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get to this table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out and get some sense -- good to talk to you. that was "after words" book tv signature program - which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv, at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. ago to booktv.org and click on "after words" and the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> with a month left in 2012,
what became got which is bob dole got and bush got running for the reelection. that is a fact. and unless we look at the california republican party finding the right individual is going to turn of the largest stake in the country sounds like a serious deep fundamental rethinking now. unfortunately i have been around for so long. i was there for the rebound after goldwater that took a total of four years and i was there for the rebound after watergate that took six years. i was there after george bush lost in '92 which took two years, and i was there after they lost the house and 06 which took four years. so he said to me and my strategically optimistic? sure. the world isn't going to be kind to obama. they will have plenty of mistakes. the challenge is not what they will do wrong. the challenge is whether we are prepared to slow down, think, have honest arguments and figure out what we need to do. if we do that, the country will be just fine. thank you very, very much. [applause] >> from albany new york we hear about the state mandated new york state reuters institute. the pr
't clear minded enough or clear eyed enough about the russians. bob gates also, who had moved over to deputy national security advisers. that little group kind of delayed the process for six months because the people in state were ready to progress with what had been achieved at the end of the second reagan administration. but it really delayed things. the person who turned that around who also deserves a great deal of credit was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an interagency management, and different players, and spent a good deal of time, would arrive in moscow with an entourage, with the negotiators, jim woolsey from csc, the relative assistant secretary, broke them into working groups and continue the process raws participated in, there was a delay. i don't think there were any problems as a result. >> just wanted to say james baker was named secretary of state the day after george bush was selected. within a week he met with regional assistant secretaries to understand their priorities. my priorities were opportunities and challenges to include ea
it up to the mid-30s. bob dole, in the middest of the sentiment in fact 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the imagine irk 40% that carl thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing the questions. you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino vote moving a million-two, a million-three, you know, what the turnout is is we don't really know yet. it will take awhile. the exit poll numbers lose credibility as time goes on, but i don't want to get too geeky with you, but say, you know, shift of a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid-30s in terms of the share saying that was a good night for republicans. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states? i know you were going to ask. [laughter] >> then i want to go down the road. >> it's interesting because it doesn't -- it would have -- if the exit polls were correct, which is insent, shifted 10% of the vote out of obama's column on romney's column, romney would have squeaked florida. clearly,
to many of you called the criterion by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book on this real first behind the scenes book. the theme of the book with all the justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand warren burger. they thought he was a pompous. that sort of contentiousness is in the rule more than the exception in the history of the supreme court. i don't know how many of you have had the misfortune to hear that justice is served from 1914 to 1941 name james mcreynolds, who such an appalling anti-semite ditties stick it a family whenever justice cardozo would speak. a cantankerous one summer had a car accident and drove his car off a cliff in the first question of who inhabit the corba service felix frankfurter at the time they hated each other so much they thought the frankfurter might've driven him off. [laughter] i was hoping a teacher and a list that i would find this cd center of the rehnquist court and the history. to my great disappointments of the journalists, but so much satisfaction as a citizen, i went rehnquist is very popular among his colleagues. he basic
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
up to the mid 30s. ronald reagan brought it up to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping-off point for neutralizing all these questions. so, you know, how -- we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino votes, moving a million two, million three, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is we don't really know yet. it's going the take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> john king. >> geeky with you. yeah. [laughter] but the shift of a million voters, million and a half voters and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share. and everybody would have said that was a pretty good night for a republican. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row to get everyone. >> it's interesting, because it d
by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dole was the first one to use the first so-called filling the tree. used it seven times. senator byrd, who never used it, that gag rule to stop the minority from offering amendments, i guess, was disappointed he hadn't thought of it so he found a way to use it three times as he was the majority leader. senator mitchell used it three times, senator lott 11, senator daschle only once this gag rule, senator frist 15. all of those leaders used it 40 times. our majority leader, senator reid has used it 68. so we can all come up with statistics on both sides, but shouldn't we just resolve that what we would like to do, show the country that we're grown-up, responsible adults and we can sit down and say, yes, we can agree on ways to make sure that most bills come to the floor and senators get to offer most of the amendments that they want to offer on the bill? i think we can do that. i think there's a spirit on both sides of the aisle to do that, and i'm working toward that goal, and i know a number of democrats and republicans are d
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)